San Luis Obispo Show: Painting on the Buchon Trail

“For a few weeks in August, 1976, Hollywood magic flipped the coasts of the United States and transformed the coast south of Moñtana de Oro State Park into Passamaquoddy, Maine. A lighthouse was built near Point Buchon as  part of Pete’s Dragon, the most expensive Walt Disney production to date.”  So reported local papers as Disney built a lighthouse on the Buchon Trail, the subject of a new show at the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art October 5-8.  I’m honored to be one of several invited artists invited to capture this landscape “en plein air” for a show of paintings fresh off the easel. The gallery above shows some of the paintings I plan to hang.

This incredible coastal area was only opened to the public a few years ago, and as far as I know, this is the first show dedicated to the unspoiled beauty of this land.  Being there last week, driven with my painting equipment in a 4-wheel drive on seldom used private dirt roads, I had a chance to see how the earliest Native Americans and their Spanish invaders witnessed an unspoiled California coast.

If you’re an artist or collector, chances are you’ve seen countless paintings of Laguna Beach, Point Lobos or Morro Bay–but you’re unlikely to  have seen this incredible landscape chosen by Disney studios to amaze movie goers.

And it is an amazing landscape.  Of particular interest (which I’m not posting here–come to the show and see it!) are the large rock stacks just off shore that are considered the “Stonehenge of the Pacific.”  They really are incredible, and I had a great time painting them to prepare for the show with fellow artists.  Several of us painted these icons, and they’re each unique.  Come see what each artist saw.

So, join us, by either viewing the show at the museum, and/or watching the artists (including me) paint the area live.  As a bonus, the proceeds from the show will help fund this local icon of Central Coast arts, the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art.  Click here for more detail, if you come, say hello!

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Moss Beach

This is one of my favorite places to paint.  It’s nearby, and has many of the features of far away (well, 1.5 hours) Point Lobos.  I’ve been painting gouache studies recently for ease of travel, and they translate well to oil, being opaque.  I like this study and will–someday–paint a large studio version.  The ArtSavesLives gallery has offered me a solo show, so perhaps sometime in 2017.  For now, this is available on my Facebook Store here, framed for $300.

Moss Beach (late afternoon, plein air), gouache on paper, 8x8"
Moss Beach (late afternoon, plein air), gouache on paper, 8×8″
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Palm Springs Plein Air

I had a great time painting plein air in Palm Springs last weekend!  I need to get back soon.  The combination of blazing, clear light; nature; and modern architecture make it a great destination for plein air painters.  Enjoy!

Indian Canyons (Palm Springs), Gouache on paper, 8x6"
Indian Canyons (Palm Springs), Gouache on paper, 8×6″
"Chilis Retreat, Palm Springs", gouache on paper, 8x6"
“Chilis Retreat, Palm Springs”, gouache on paper, 8×6″
"Chili's Retreat, by the pool (Palm Springs), Gouache on paper, 6x6"
“Chili’s Retreat, by the pool (Palm Springs), Gouache on paper, 6×6”
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Open Studios Online & San Francisco

I’m pleased to return to Open Studios this year after a 5+ year absence.  Choose from a selection of reasonably priced framed watercolor and gouache works at my online store, or, visit our pop-up gallery in the Castro the month of November.  The opening reception will be held November 11, 6-9:30pm.  Thomasina, the gallery director, puts on amazing parties–lots of live music, entertaining and dancing!

Asilomar Dunes, Gouache on Paper, 8x8"
Asilomar Dunes, Gouache on Paper, 8×8″
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Using Art to Balance Life

Duboce & Buena Vista Park, Gouache on Paper, 4x6"
Duboce & Buena Vista Park, Gouache on Paper, 4×6″

I’ve enjoyed a long, fulfilling career in Silicon Valley.  It’s an incredibly diverse, constantly changing place and state of mind. It’s easy to be consumed here in a world where creating disruption is your job. It see it everywhere as I walk the city (my favorite past-time). I notice the first-time tourists who see San Francisco through fresh eyes contrasted with the emerging technology class glued to their latest device. Watching them, I ask myself, do they miss the wonder in the eyes of newcomers around them?  Can we maintain curiosity, and see the world anew every day?

As an Industry Analyst at Altimeter Group, my job now is to understand and council others in technology disruption. But I need a constant: a foundation that puts these ceaseless changes in perspective. How can you understand change without understanding the starting point? For me that starts with family of course, but also, seeing and expressing the undeniable beauty around me every day. So, I paint and sketch. Every day. Maybe it’s a “left brain, right brain” thing, but for me, creating something of lasting beauty in a world of ephemeral apps, devices and marketing campaigns gives me the foundation I need to notice. And noticing—being aware—is the first step in understanding the world as it is and can be.

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Variations on a Theme

I was speaking to someone on a airplane last night about the visual arts and how they relate to music. Here’s my analogy: In high school, I played jazz trombone. Key to that genre is the ability to improvise. It’s a beautiful thing to hear a musician create new music on the fly during an improvisation. What may seem to be a beautiful, but haphazard, run of notes is actually the result of playing within the composer’s written sequence of cord progressions. The jazz musician creates in the moment, but she does so based on what’s in front of her: sheet music (in a sense). The same is very much true of those artists that create variations based on a theme. The subject is the theme (sheet music) and the art is the variation (improvisation).

For me, a recent theme has been Moss Beach, here in Northern California. The series of paintings below shows how I’ve studied this area, and created variations on this landscape. The first three paintings are based on the same spot, but with different mediums–oil, watercolor–and different perspectives. The last 4 are looking in a different direction, but again, studies of the same view using different mediums and ideas. From these studies, I’m learning to record and compare my feelings for the spot so I can later determine what resonates and where to build upon–as, for example, a larger studio work.

I hope you enjoy these improvisations of Moss Beach. More to come.

Moss Beach Cove, Oil on Linen, 9x12
Moss Beach Cove, Oil on Linen, 9×12
Moss Beach Cove, Watercolor, 6x6
Moss Beach Cove, Watercolor, 6×6″
Moss Beach Study, Watercolor, 9x12
Moss Beach Study, Watercolor, 9×12
Moss Beach Bluffs 1, Watercolor, 6x6
Moss Beach Bluffs 1, Watercolor, 6×6
Moss Beach Study 2, Watercolor, 6x6
Moss Beach Study 2, Watercolor, 6×6
Moss Beach Bluffs 5, Watercolor, 4x6.5
Moss Beach Bluffs 5, Watercolor, 4×6.5″

 

Moss Beach Bluffs #3, Oil on Linen, 12x9
Moss Beach Bluffs #3, Oil on Linen, 12×9″
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New Digital Art Marketing Research

Leveraging my experience as a digital marketing professional, I have conducted some new research with the goal of educating artists about how to approach sales and marketing online.  The research is based on a survey I conducted.  The report is available below, and includes some interesting data and insights.  I conducted research last year as well, available here.

As always, I’d like to hear from you.  Please enter your feedback on this blog post’s comments.  Cheers!

Art Marketing Research (2014)
Art Marketing Research (2014)
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San Miguel de Allende

San Miguel de Allende in central Mexico is a real gem. The centro’s architecture is Spanish Colonial, and the people there are  wonderful.  Love painting there, and finally got Mike to go on a visit recently.  Here are some paintings in watercolor and oil.  Enjoy!

Joyce's Pool #2 (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico), Watercolor
Joyce’s Pool #2 (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico), Watercolor
Joyce's Pool #1 (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico), Watercolor
Joyce’s Pool #1 (San Miguel de Allende, Mexico), Watercolor

 

San Miguel de Allende, Watercolor
San Miguel de Allende, Watercolor
San Miguel de Allende (from Casa Schuck), Oil on Linen, 11x14
San Miguel de Allende (from Casa Schuck), Oil on Linen, 11×14
San Miguel de Allende Sunset, Oil on Linen, 8x10
San Miguel de Allende Sunset, Oil on Linen, 8×10

 

 

 

 

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Moss Beach Seascapes

I’ve found a new favorite place to paint, Moss Beach.  The spot I found (at Juliana Ave, Moss Beach, CA 94038) is small, but has it all: Monterey Cypress, ice plant, bluffs, a small beach. It’s also closer than favorite spots like Point Lobos, so I expect to return here often.

Enjoy this latest work, and as always, your comments are welcome.

This study is probably my favorite, as it’s closer to the loose, painterly approach that I’m aiming for.

Juicy Surf, Oil on Linen, 9x12
Juicy Surf, Oil on Linen, 9×12″

Here’s a gray day view of the bluffs.  Painting on gray days is often under-valued by artists, who prefer full sun, but gray days keep the light consistent for a longer period of time, so the plein air painter has more time to complete a painting.  You’re not “chasing the sun”.

Moss Beach Bluffs (Gray Day), Oil on Linen, 11x14
Moss Beach Bluffs (Gray Day), Oil on Linen, 11×14

 

Moss Beach Bluffs #2, Oil on Linen, 11x14
Moss Beach Bluffs #2, Oil on Linen, 11×14

 

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Figurative Watercolors

Mike and I have planned a trip to Maui! It’s been a long time since we’ve enjoyed a vacation together, so I’m really looking forward to it. Since I don’t plan to travel with my full oil setup, I will paint watercolors plein air. I think there’s something about Hawaii and the tropics that lends itself well to watercolor–the lightness of it all.

To prepare my watercolor skills (which are minimal), I’ve started to paint the figure. It’s a great way to “kill two birds with one stone”: both learn the medium and continue to improve my drawing skills. Of course, painting the figure is the best way to improve drawing because it’s obvious when you make even the slightest error. The first two studies below were painted at a local gay bar (Moby Dick). An artist in the neighborhood thought it would be nice to have a drawing group there, and I have to say, it was really fun. It is a gay bar, so lots of pulsing music and local characters, but I ended up having a great time. It’s Monday nights (at least through the Summer )if you’re interested (7:30-10:30pm).

The last painting is just another tennis player study, in oil. I’ve been doing a seriers of these. The strong light on a tennis court makes for some very interesting color situations–especially reflected light. Enjoy!

Atelier Moby Dick 1, Watercolor, 6x6
Atelier Moby Dick 1, Watercolor, 6×6

Available on my website for purchase here.

 

Atelier Moby Dick 2, Watercolor, 6x6
Atelier Moby Dick 2, Watercolor, 6×6
Tennis Player 3, Oil on Linen, 10x5.5
Tennis Player 3, Oil on Linen, 10×5.5″

 

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The painting adventures of Ed Terpening