Hearst Castle Plein Air Invitational

It’s been a wonderful couple days here at Hearst Castle for the invitational.  The artists and staff of the castle have been great.  I can’t wait to see everyone’s work framed for the show June 5. Tickets are available for $175 for the Friends of Hearst Castle’sTwilight on the Terrace” fundraiser benefiting art programs for at risk youth.

Ed Terpening, Hearst Castle, May 13, 2010
Ed Terpening, Hearst Castle, May 13, 2010

My first effort was painting “Casa del Mar”, a guest house on the South Terrace of the castle. I got to take a peak inside…wow.  Opulent doesn’t begin to describe it.  Hearst himself spent his final years in this house.  This is just about done, I think a couple minor tweaks when I get back to my studio should do it.

Casa Del Marr, Hearst Castle - Oil on Linen - 10x12
Casa Del Marr, Hearst Castle - Oil on Linen - 10x12

My next effort was painting this white marble statue, which I imagine is Cupid (sans arrow).  While in full sun is always a joy for me to paint, as white takes on so many colors and reflections of light. I’m not sure the color of reflect light is quite right, so I may make some adjustments before I call this one done.

Cupid (Hearst Castle), Oil on Linen, 12x9
Cupid (Hearst Castle), Oil on Linen, 12x9

And on my final day, again on the South Terrace outside Casa del Mar, I painted this fountain and gold statue of a princess holding a frog. I realize the princess statue on top looks like an Oscar statuette, but that’s really what it looks like!  Even the shadow side on the gold had a red glow. I’m happy with this one.  It’s interesting to me because it almost looks like two different painters/styles: the fountain is high-key, colorist, and the background trees and distant shore are more traditional value painting.

South Terrace View (Hearst Castle), Oil on Linen, 12x9
South Terrace View (Hearst Castle), Oil on Linen, 12x9

As you can see, all of these paintings push color a bit.  With full sun available, I didn’t paint much tonally.  To make sure these colors are still on track, I look at the images in black & white as well.  If light and shadow read well in black/white, it almost doesn’t matter what color you choose to paint (see my 2007 post on values). I think the light/shadow patterns read in this black/white versions, so these seem to be working.

And here’s the group of painters.

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